Solo Practice: Relationships

written by Pamela Vail (music by Ron Rost)

This score includes an audio component, in which you will be led into movement by Pamela Vail.

1. Download the audio track Solo Practice: Relationships (click the yellow audio button link, above, to download all audio tracks for this website) to your phone or listening device. You can use headphones or run the audio through a speaker. It is best to download the track onto your device first and then play it.


2. Find a place that you feel comfortable moving in and play the audio track for this score. Feel free to pause the recording at any time if it is moving too fast for you.


We are always in relationship to everything. What happens when we direct our attention to specific relationships?


Find a comfortable position to begin (sitting, standing, lying down). Eyes closed or not. Put yourself in relationship to your breath.

Invite movement impulses, putting them in relationship to your breath.

[Work with that for a few minutes.]


Then put yourself in relationship to the floor (if your eyes have been closed, begin to open them here). Notice what you notice about how/if your movement changes.

[Work with that for a few minutes.]


Now put yourself in relationship to the ceiling. Notice what you notice about how/if your movement changes.

[Work with that for a few minutes.]


Choose something in the room to put yourself in relationship to (a chair, a pillow, a set of keys, a painting, an aspect of the architecture, etc.)—spatially, energetically, in terms of scale, color, shape…

After a few minutes of exploration, let that go and choose something else in the room.

After a few minutes, add the first thing you chose to this second one, so you are simultaneously putting yourself in relationship to two objects in/aspects of the room at once.

[Work with that for a few minutes.]


You can continue to accumulate physical things in the room to put yourself in relationship to, basically overwhelming yourself and stretching your stamina of attention until you are holding the awareness of your relationship to the whole space and everything in it.

Within the body—specificity and physical play with relationship (some suggestions):

Put your spine in relationship to your feet.

Put the top of your skull in relationship to your arms.

Put your chin in relationship to your right heel.

Put your knees in relationship to your throat.

Etc. –pick any two (or more!) body parts to play with relationship, and notice what happens to your movement.

Putting choices/impulses in relationship to intangible/imagined elements (some suggestions):

Put your movement in relationship to the past.

Put your movement in relationship to the future.

Put your movement in relationship to your thoughts.

Put your movement in relationship to some other place in the world (you choose).


[You could also experiment with putting your movement in relationship to music/soundexpanding/building from perhaps some habitual relationships to sound. Notice texture, tone, rhythm, pitch, volume, etc. If you normally latch onto rhythm, see if you can focus on melody, and vice-versa. Go beyond complementing, or illustrating the sound, and experiment with contrasting or counterpointing, weaving in and out, etc.]

Prompt for Response:

Did any prompt(s) feel particularly challenging, or frustrating? Why? Did any prompt(s) feel particularly potent, or intriguing? Why? Did any prompt(s) feel confusing? Why? Did you choose your own relationships to play with? If so, what were they? Did you notice your body moving in new or strange or interesting or familiar ways? With what prompt(s) did you notice those sensations? Write your response in the comments, below.

movement crossings + website created by  tori lawrence

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